Curriculum

The Master's Program in Gerontology is structured into 3 parts:

  1. Core Courses;
  2. Either the thesis or non-thesis option;
  3. Electives Coursework.

Both options require a total of 36 semester hours of graduate credit for completion of the degree.

Core Courses

The following 21 credits of common core courses are required:

Gerontology 6600: Current Issues in Gerontology (3 credits) Study of current issues and topics in the field of aging from an interdisciplinary perspective; an ethical framework will be used to examine the issues. (Fall)

Sociology 6130: Sociology of Aging: Theories and Research (3G credits). Application of stratification theories and demography are applied specifically to the older population. Issues of race, gender, socio-economic status, age, and geographic distribution are examined in order to investigate the diversity of the older age group and their access to resources. (Spring)

Psychology 6124: Psychology of Aging (3G credits) Particular emphasis on issues related to community/clinical psychology and industrial/organizational psychology. Topics include myths and stereotypes about aging, problems faced by older workers, retirement, mental health and normal aging, counseling the older adult, and psychological disorders in later life. (Fall)

Nursing 6275: Health Promotion and Wellness for Older Adults (3G credits) Self-care measures and health promotion practices to promote a healthy lifestyle are discussed. Included are principles of teaching and learning adapted to the elderly client needed by health care and other professionals who teach and plan programs for the older client. Common barriers to health care for the elderly are examined. (Spring)

Gerontology 6201: Research and Methods in Aging I (3G credits). Prerequisite: Statistics. Examination of the variety of qualitative and quantitative methods used in research on aging and analysis of Gerontology research from a range of disciplines. Students will develope a working draft of their thesis/ applied project proposal. (Fall)

Gerontology 6202: Research and Methods in Aging (3G credits). Prerequisite: GRNT 6201. Examination of the variety of qualitative and quantitative methods used in evaluation research in applied settings. Students will develop an evaluation project plan. Students will also refine their thesis/applied project proposal. (Spring)

Gerontology 6400: Practicum (3G credits). Completion of a field-based educational experience which relates to the student's career goals and objectives. (Summer)

After completion of the required core courses, all students must successfully complete an oral comprehensive examination. For both thesis and applied project students, this will occur at the same time as the defense of their thesis or project.

 

Either the thesis (A) or non-thesis (B) option

In addition to these core courses students will complete either:

(A) the thesis option

which entails nine hours of elective credits chosen with the advice and approval of the student's academic adviser and six hours of thesis credits and an oral defense.

Thesis students will develop a working draft of their proposal as part of the course requirements for GRNT 6201. (See thesis/applied project guidelines)

Students must apply for admission to the thesis option before completing GRNT 6201 (form available in Appendix B of Graduate Handbook of Gerontology Program).

The Thesis involves a major project, usually an original research project. It will be coordinated with the student's major interests and practical experience to allow the development of an area of specialization. The Thesis must conform to the University Guidelines for Masters Theses.

(B) the non-thesis option (Applied Project)

This entails 15 hours of elective courses chosen with the advice and approval of the student's academic adviser. Three elective credits will generally be earned for the Applied Project, taken as GRNT 6800 - Independent Research Study.

The Applied Project involves an original project that addresses a specific problem in the applied field. It will be coordinated with the student's major interests and practical experience to allow the development of an area of specialization. The audience of an Applied Project is generally others in the applied field.

This option requires that students design a working draft of an Applied Project proposal in conjunction with GRNT 6201 and 6202. Topics developed with the support and approval of the student's Graduate Committee. (See thesis/non-thesis applied project guidelines).

Students must apply for admission to the applied project option before completing GRNT 6201 (form in Appendix B).

 

Elective Courses

Students will select elective courses with the advice and approval of their advisor and the Program Director.

Elective choices will include:

GRNT 5050. Topics in Gerontology (1-4G)
GRNT 5250. Programs and Services for the Aging (3G)
GRNT 6800. Independent Research Study
(can be repeated, up to 6 credits can be counted towards M.A. electives) (3G)

MPAD GRNT 6210. Aging and Public Policy (3G)
MPAD GRNT 6211. Administration of Aging Programs (3G)
NURS 6115. Health Planning in the Health Care System (3G)
NURS 6276. Common Illnesses Associated with Older Adulthood (3G)
MPAD 6172. Administration of the Health Care System (3G)
SOCY 5134. Families and Aging (3G)